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Virgil News and Announcements
Picture Day - August 28, 2017

All students must be in school uniform.
Only students who will be purchasing the picture packets are allowed to be out of uniform. Students must follow the non-uniform dress guideline. 

Students make sure that you have your payment ready and give your payment to the photographer on picture day. You can also pay online. Click on the image below for more information.
Image result for mylifetouch

 
Virgil's Preparation and Precautionary Plans for Solar Eclipse Monday, August 21.
  1. OEHS Safety Alerts have been distributed to all students
  2. Teachers will discuss precautions necessary with students whenever possible.
  3. All teachers conducting ‘viewing events’ must have signed parent permission slips from all students participating.
  4. Students in classes of teachers who are facilitating viewing events that do not have signed permission slips will have an opportunity to watch a live stream of the event in the Virgil Auditorium.
  5. Supervision staff will proactively communicate precautions to students during all times that students are outside during passing periods and break - between the hours of 9 and Noon.
  6. PE classes during period 1, 2, 3 and 4 will be held in the gym or auditorium (based on PE teacher’s discretion).
  7. Auditorium will be made available to students during the morning break.

 

Solar Eclipse Advisory

SOLAR ECLIPSE VIEWING PRECAUTIONS
AUGUST 2017
On Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse will be visible across North America. Weather permitting, the entire continent will have the opportunity to view the eclipse as the moon passes in front of the sun, casting a shadow on the Earth’s surface. The eclipse will first be visible at 9:05 a.m. PDT in the West and end at 4:09 p.m. EDT in the East.
A total solar eclipse will not be visible from California, meaning that a portion of the sun will still be visible even as the eclipse reaches its peak. Special safety precautions must be taken by those viewing any phase of the eclipse. The attached precautions from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) must be strictly followed to view the 2017 solar eclipse safely. For more safety and general information on the eclipse, please visit NASA’s website at https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety. If you have additional questions, contact the Office of Environmental Health & Safety at (213) 241-3199 or at http://achieve.lausd.net/oehs.
Office of Environmental Health & Safety 333 S. Beaudry Avenue, 21st Floor Los Angeles, CA 90017 Phone: (213) 241-3199 Fax: (213) 241-6816
SAFETY ALERT

Always inspect your solar filter before use; if scratched or damaged, discard it. Read and follow any instructions printed on or packaged with the filter.

Always supervise children using solar filters.

Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright sun. After looking at the sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the sun.

Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device.

Similarly, do not look at the sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury.

Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device. Note that solar filters must be attached to the front of any telescope, binoculars, camera lens, or other optics.

If you are within the path of totality (https://go.nasa.gov/2pC0lhe), remove your solar filter only when the moon completely covers the sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. Experience totality, then, as soon as the bright sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to look at the remaining partial phases.

Outside the path of totality, you must always use a safe solar filter to view the sun directly.

If you normally wear eyeglasses, keep them on. Put your eclipse glasses on over them, or hold your handheld viewer in front of them.
Note: If your eclipse glasses or viewers are compliant with the ISO 12312-2 safety standard, you may look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun through them for as long as you wish. Furthermore, if the filters aren’t scratched, punctured, or torn, you may reuse them indefinitely. Some glasses/viewers are printed with warnings stating that you shouldn’t look through them for more than 3 minutes at a time and that you should discard them if they are more than 3 years old. Such warnings are outdated and do not apply to eclipse viewers compliant with the ISO 12312-2 standard adopted in 2015. To make sure you get (or got) your eclipse glasses/viewers from a supplier of ISO-compliant products, see the American Astronomical Society (AAS) Reputable Vendors of Solar Filters & Viewers page.
An alternative method for safe viewing of the partially eclipsed sun is pinhole projection. For example, cross the outstretched, slightly open fingers of one hand over the outstretched, slightly open fingers of the other, creating a waffle pattern. With your back to the sun, look at your hands’ shadow on the ground. The little spaces between your fingers will project a grid of small images on the ground, showing the sun as a crescent during the partial phases of the eclipse. Or just look at the shadow of a leafy tree during the partial eclipse; you’ll see the ground dappled with crescent Suns projected by the tiny spaces between the leaves.
A solar eclipse is one of nature’s grandest spectacles. By following these simple rules, you can safely enjoy the view and be rewarded with memories to last a lifetime. More information:
eclipse.aas.org eclipse2017.nasa.gov
This document does not constitute medical advice. Readers with questions should contact a qualified eye-care professional. v.170702
Looking directly at the sun is unsafe except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (“totality”), when the moon entirely blocks the sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality (https://go.nasa.gov/2pC0lhe).
The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” (example shown at left) or hand-held solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the sun; they transmit thousands of times too much sunlight. Refer to the American Astronomical Society (AAS) Reputable Vendors of Solar Filters & Viewers page for a list of manufacturers and authorized dealers of eclipse glasses and handheld solar viewers verified to be compliant with the ISO 12312-2 international safety standard for such products.

EXPERIENCE
THE
2017 ECLIPSE
ACROSS AMERICA
THROUGH THE EYES OF NASA
http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov
www.nasa.gov
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